koreastandardtime:

Oh my, there certainly is a lot of heated indignation over the outcome of the ladies’ figure skating final in Sochi. Russia’s Adelina Sotnikova bested South Korea’s Kim Yu-na for the gold, a decision that’s being questioned by everyone from Kim’s cheering section back home to perplexed U.S. sports columnists who felt that “Queen Yuna” deserved to keep her Olympic crown.
Christine Brennan of USA Today points out that Thursday’s judging panel included the wife of the president of the Russian figure skating federation (!) and a Ukrainian judge who had been caught trying to fix the outcome of the ice dancing competition at the 1998 Nagano Olympics (!!). Just crazy.
Some of the judging did indeed seem a bit peculiar. Japan’s Mao Asada performed an absolutely brilliant free skate and, despite her sadly awful short program on Wednesday, should have finished better than Russia’s Yulia Lipnitskaya, who came in fifth. While Ashley Wagner of the U.S. didn’t skate as beautifully as Asada did, she nailed her performance Thursday and also should have placed better than Lipnitskaya.
But I have to admit that I don’t quite share the outrage over Kim coming in second to Sotnikova. The judges successfully completed their most important task: awarding medals to the three best performers: Sotnikova, Kim and Carolina Kostner of Italy. 
If it had been up to me, I’d have given the gold medal to Kim. Her performance was pure fluid grace — there’s never been a more exquisite figure skater in my lifetime. But the scores for the top three skaters were very close after the short program and the Russian’s nearly flawless free skate was technically more challenging, thus giving her an edge.
Sotnikova wasn’t the most refined or graceful competitor on the ice. But you could make the argument that she was the most athletically accomplished. Figure skating is, at the end of the day, a sport, even though — as the likes of Kim, Kostner and Asada demonstrated Thursday — the line between sport and art can be blurred quite beautifully.
(Sochi Olympics Figure Skating by Chicago Sun-Times on Flickr.)

Ditto High-res

koreastandardtime:

Oh my, there certainly is a lot of heated indignation over the outcome of the ladies’ figure skating final in Sochi. Russia’s Adelina Sotnikova bested South Korea’s Kim Yu-na for the gold, a decision that’s being questioned by everyone from Kim’s cheering section back home to perplexed U.S. sports columnists who felt that “Queen Yuna” deserved to keep her Olympic crown.

Christine Brennan of USA Today points out that Thursday’s judging panel included the wife of the president of the Russian figure skating federation (!) and a Ukrainian judge who had been caught trying to fix the outcome of the ice dancing competition at the 1998 Nagano Olympics (!!). Just crazy.

Some of the judging did indeed seem a bit peculiar. Japan’s Mao Asada performed an absolutely brilliant free skate and, despite her sadly awful short program on Wednesday, should have finished better than Russia’s Yulia Lipnitskaya, who came in fifth. While Ashley Wagner of the U.S. didn’t skate as beautifully as Asada did, she nailed her performance Thursday and also should have placed better than Lipnitskaya.

But I have to admit that I don’t quite share the outrage over Kim coming in second to Sotnikova. The judges successfully completed their most important task: awarding medals to the three best performers: Sotnikova, Kim and Carolina Kostner of Italy. 

If it had been up to me, I’d have given the gold medal to Kim. Her performance was pure fluid grace — there’s never been a more exquisite figure skater in my lifetime. But the scores for the top three skaters were very close after the short program and the Russian’s nearly flawless free skate was technically more challenging, thus giving her an edge.

Sotnikova wasn’t the most refined or graceful competitor on the ice. But you could make the argument that she was the most athletically accomplished. Figure skating is, at the end of the day, a sport, even though — as the likes of Kim, Kostner and Asada demonstrated Thursday — the line between sport and art can be blurred quite beautifully.

(Sochi Olympics Figure Skating by Chicago Sun-Times on Flickr.)

Ditto

cafe/karaoke.  that entire cafe is as big as one room in a typical korean noraebang.  the door faces the street and the ppl were just going at their favorite songs.  there were many cafes stacked next to each other on that street for older customers who want more than just coffee n ciggies. #vietnam #hanoi #karaoke #travel #베트남 #하노이 #가라오케 #카페 #여행 #동남아 High-res

cafe/karaoke. that entire cafe is as big as one room in a typical korean noraebang. the door faces the street and the ppl were just going at their favorite songs. there were many cafes stacked next to each other on that street for older customers who want more than just coffee n ciggies. #vietnam #hanoi #karaoke #travel #베트남 #하노이 #가라오케 #카페 #여행 #동남아

"Bitter, Sweet, Seoul" 고진감래
A movie about my dear city and hometown, Seoul.
Commissioned by the City of Seoul and its mayor Wonsoon PARK to the great PARK Chan Wook and his bro PARK Chan Kyeong. PARK Chanwook and his team called out for open global contributions last year, which resulted in around 12,000 video clips and short films made by people around the world.

Pensive, heart wrenching, beautifully captured and edited. A great reminder as to how much I love this amazing humanistic city full of future, hope, dynamic energy and possibilities. Seoul is really where I belong.

I went to its premier and had the honour of being photographed with the directors and the major, who is my hero! yay

(via http://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=vXJQhP8COrM&u=/watch?v=x1X5N679noM&feature=share)